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Blog Posts (13)

  • Lead or be led

    by Rishika Gupta In human interactions, you may feel there are few people whom you get along with easily, and few people that no matter how hard you try, their tend to be miscommunication and frustrating because there is just such a huge gap between what one conveys and what the other understands. Now picture this happening in a business setting. When working or entrepreneuring, you interact with a spectrum of professionals and you have to prepare to work with every type of personality. A helpful way of gauging human personalities is by understanding yours. Taking a Myers-Briggs Test [MBTI] is a great way of self-reflection. Do note that this is not an accurate representation but a helpful tool in gaining an insight in your personality traits. When you master what motivates you, wonder how you can motivate others? Be a leader in your workplace and life and inspire those around you, or better understand the nature of your managers to adjust your working style to match theirs, or vice versa. As per Ivey Business School, there are 13 managerial leadership styles: · Autocratic: Effective in showcasing strong leadership in times of crisis. For example: Elon Musk at Twitter. But what that may do is alienate the workforce as it essentially means that it is only the leader/managers whose opinion matters. · Affiliative: They consider their team as their affiliates and important to business decisions. It’s people over profits and integral to ensuring that their opinion matters. · Bureaucratic: Bureaucratic leaders tend to be traditionalist and believe in forms, policies and procedures. · Coaching: A coach takes a mentor like role for their associates. They nurture their talent by identifying which characteristic is best suited for a role and provide opportunities to grow and succeed. · Democratic: Involves considering their teams’ inputs in form of opinions and efforts. They believe that employees are closer to the problem than leaders and value their contribution. · Laissez-faire: The leader takes minimal decisions and delegates the work. For example: if an upcoming event is to take place, delegating the preparation and decision-making power to his/her subordinate · Emergent: This involves a sort of style which you may embody yourself. Emergent leaders are ones who take up the leadership mantle when no leader is elected or assigned. They earn goodwill within the organization for taking initiative and convincing teammates to organize and work together. · Pacesetting: A leader who leads by example and would expect of his team members what he/she expects of himself/herself. Setting goals to achieve and surpass consistently is a key feature of a pacesetting leader. · Servant: A servant leader places more emphasis on the stakeholders they’re responsible for. A CEO may be accountable and prioritizing shareholder interest, or a manager may do as the line manager says, with little consideration for himself or his team. · Strategic: A great thinker who considers all aspects before making a decision. Growth is the name of the game and one who is empathetic but also strategic. For example: would help schedule leaves in such a way a team member is not left to manage the entire workload. · Transactional: Such a leader is focused on the tasks completed, ensuring required needs are met and would do little to go above and beyond for his employees. · Transformative: Someone who encourages you to go the extra mile little by little. If a target for 100 sales calls is set, they would motivate you to fit in 10 more and reward you for it, in turn helping you exceed your expectations and work better. · Visionary: Finally, such a visionary is one who can bring about change. A changemaker to inspire and extract creativity to take the company ahead. Learn more about leaders, leadership styles and see how you can grow in your career, sign up for the WorkEx Bootcamp’s Leadership Track featuring Leadership Principles by HBS Online in collaboration with Podar Enterprises.

  • Negotiation across your career

    by Rishika Gupta When you’re in college and just starting out on your career, questions of self-doubt can plague your mind. When you’re on the cusp of entering the real world, a key skill that not many discuss is the art of negotiation. As an employee, the first stage of negotiation you would come across is at your first job. Through your course you may have taken up internships, but a key difference here is that in an internship, your salary is fixed and your main goal is to gain exposure and experience. The priorities when you’re starting your first job are very different. Now you’re looking to set up your own life and earn a living, in order to maximise that, it is important to keep self-doubt aside and negotiate your worth, while being respectful to the company budgets, policies and bosses. The best way to reach and identify common ground is to do your research. Speak to mentors and professionals in the industry to identify what is the average pay range for your role. Also be mindful of the experience you bring to the table. For example: if you’re a fresher with minimal internship experience, you would not be in a place to negotiate a higher salary package; but if you have 4-5 internships under your belt, safe to say that the HR team would respect the experience you bring as compared to someone more inexperienced as you would require lesser training as well. Within your role, if you work with vendors especially, finding the best value for money sources would enhance your value to the firm. In a place like India, you can always find the next best or in most cases, more affordable option for any item. The key differentiator can be creating strong connections with those suppliers so as to form your own base to advance in your career and knowledge. A key differentiator between junior and senior members of a team is yet again, experience. Negotiation is a nuanced art wherein the right way of talking can result a 10% cost reduction and strategizing partnerships for long-term benefits. As a student this may seem daunting especially since the world is more ruthless than ever. When speaking with someone, always try to identify what their motivations could be. Most likely, they too have some targets to meet. Forming a friendship can mean that you form a level of commercial trust and receive best prices from both sourcer, supplier and seller. A great way to practice this skill is to participate in events or select roles in internships that involve speaking to outside stakeholders. Negotiation involves the process of extracting value from a scarce resource, which may not always be money. Within the organization, finding a mentor to give insider advice on how to get your proposal approved, or which is the best place to find the cheapest source of office equipment. The benefits are endless. Negotiating for time with them is also important in highlighting ‘your edge’ as someone who knows how to help both parties involved in the deal. As you’re up for the promotion, these skills would be the necessary soft skills a leader ought to possess to drive incremental value for the people, purpose and profits in an organization. Create your own learning journey, or make the process just a little bit easier by learning tips, tricks and theories from the one of the world’s best business schools, check out the Negotiation Mastery course as part of the WorkEx Bootcamp, sign up today!

  • Design Think(ing) to Innovate

    by Sakshi Chavan Design Thinking is about taking a human-centred approach to innovation that draws from a designers toolkit to integrate the needs of the consumer. Simply put, it is about thinking about a business problem with sensitivity, and not basing the innovation process solely on numbers, adding a touch of human intuition. Commonly referred to as creative thinking, this process plays a pivotal role in shaping the products and experiences that you hope to translate in the customer experience. Integrating Design Thinking into development processes unlocks business potential. It adds a layer of assuring that the products intended for customers is not only meeting a consumer need, but also economically viable in terms of feasibility and profitability. The approach is a non-linear, iterative process that teams use to understand users, challenge assumptions, redefine problems and create innovative solutions to prototype and test. Involving five phases—Empathise, Define, Ideate, Prototype and Test—it is especially useful in open-ended and abstract problems. Some of the most successful organisations such as Google, Apple and Airbnb have employed it to notable effect. Design-led companies such as Apple, Pepsi, Procter & Gamble and SAP have outperformed the S&P 500 by an extraordinary 211%. As per IDEO, an organization who is often credited with inventing the term “design thinking” and its practice, believes that the concept of design thinking is such that: “Give someone a fish, and they’ll have food for a day, teach someone to fish and they’ll have food for life”. Similarly, if you launch a product, it may give you temporary success, but if you learn design thinking, you would have cracked the code to pushing out successful products consistently. Design Thinking and the Process Design thinking’s value as a driving force in business makes it a popular subject at leading international universities. With design thinking, teams have the freedom to generate ground-breaking solutions. Using it, a team can gain hard-to-access insights and apply a collection of hands-on methods to help find innovative answers. The process involves the following 5 stages: Stage 1: Empathize—Research Your Users' Needs This step involves obtaining an empathetic understanding of the problem you’re trying to solve, typically through user research. Empathy is crucial to a human-centered design process such as design thinking because it allows you to set aside your own assumptions about the world and gain real insight into users and their needs. Consult experts to find out more about the area of concern and conduct observations to engage and empathise with your users. You may also want to immerse yourself in your users’ physical environment to gain a deeper, personal understanding of the issues involved—as well as their experiences and motivations. Empathy is crucial to problem solving and a human-centred design process as it allows design thinkers to set aside their own assumptions about the world and gain real insight into users and their needs. Stage 2: Define—State Your Users' Needs and Problems Next you accumulate the information gathered during the Empathise stage. You then analyse your observations and synthesise them to define the core problems you and your team have identified. These definitions are called problem statements. One can create personas to help keep your efforts human-centred before proceeding to ideation. The Define stage will help the design team collect great ideas to establish features, functions and other elements to solve the problem at hand—or, at the very least, allow real users to resolve issues themselves with minimal difficulty. In this stage, you will start to progress to the third stage, the ideation phase, where you ask questions to help you look for solutions. Stage 3: Ideate—Challenge Assumptions and Create Ideas Next, you’re ready to generate ideas. The solid background of knowledge from the first two phases means you can start to “think outside the box”, look for alternative ways to view the problem and identify innovative solutions to the problem statement you’ve created. There are multiple ideation techniques we can use—such as Brainstorm, Brainwrite, Worst Possible Idea and SCAMPER. Brainstorm and Worst Possible Idea techniques are typically used at the start of the ideation stage to stimulate free thinking and expand the problem space. This allows you to generate as many ideas as possible at the start of ideation. One should pick other ideation techniques towards the end of this stage to help you investigate and test your ideas, and choose the best ones to move forward with—either because they seem to solve the problem or provide the elements required to circumvent it. Stage 4: Prototype—Start to Create Solutions This is an experimental phase. The aim is to identify the best possible solution for each problem found. A team should produce some inexpensive, scaled-down versions of the product to investigate the ideas you’ve generated. This could involve simply paper prototyping. Stage 5: Test—Try Your Solutions Out Evaluators rigorously test the prototypes. Although this is the final phase, design thinking is iterative: teams often use the results to redefine one or more further problems. So, one can return to previous stages to make further iterations, alterations and refinements – to find or rule out alternative solutions. In the Define stage, you will organize the information you have gathered during the Empathize stage. You’ll analyze your observations to define the core problems you and your team have identified up to this point. Defining the problem and problem statement must be done in a human-centred manner. In employing design thinking, you’re pulling together what’s desirable from a human point of view with what is technologically feasible and economically viable. It also allows those who aren't trained as designers to use creative tools to address a vast range of challenges. The process starts with taking action and understanding the right questions. It’s about embracing simple mindset shifts and tackling problems from a new direction. When done right, design thinking will help you understand the mindsets and needs of the people you're creating for, surface opportunities based on these needs, and lead you to innovative new solutions starting with quick, low-fidelity experiments that provide learning and gradually increase in fidelity. The Four Principles of Design Thinking There are four principles of Design Thinking as laid out by Christoph Meinel and Harry Leifer of the Hasso-Plattner-Institute of Design at Stanford University, California, are: The human rule: No matter what the context, all design activity is social in nature, and any social innovation will bring us back to the “human-centric point of view”. The ambiguity rule: Ambiguity is inevitable, and it cannot be removed or oversimplified. Experimenting at the limits of your knowledge and ability is crucial in being able to see things differently. The redesign rule: All design is redesign. While technology and social circumstances may change and evolve, basic human needs remain unchanged. We essentially only redesign the means of fulfilling these needs or reaching desired outcomes. The tangibility rule: Making ideas tangible in the form of prototypes enables designers to communicate them more effectively. Design is transforming the way leading companies create value. The focus of innovation has shifted from being engineering-driven to design-driven, from product-centric to customer-centric, and from marketing-focused to user-experience-focused. For an increasing number of CEOs, design thinking is at the core of effective strategy development and organisational change. The Takeaway To conclude, Roger Martin, former Dean of Rotman School and author of The Design of Business, asserts, “Design-thinking firms stand apart in their willingness to engage in the task of continuously redesigning their business… to create advances in both innovation and efficiency – the combination that produces the most powerful competitive edge.” Learn more about Design Thinking in Startup Design 101 module, part of the WorkEx Bootcamp. References www.designthinking.ideo.com www.interaction-design.org www.creativityatwork.com www.careerfoundry.com www.ideou.com

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  • Contact Us | Podar Eduspace

    Contact Us Do you have any questions about our upskill programs? Feel free to contact us with your queries, curiosities or even ideas at - ​ Email : contact@podareduspace.org Contact Number : +91 9820227795 Office Address : Podar House, 10 Marine Drive, Mumbai ​ ​

  • Programmes | Podar Eduspace

    We are here to help you find your edge. Podar Eduspace Our Programs Take the next step towards your success by upskilling yourself with our selection of Podar Eduspace ​ courses and offerings WorkEx Bootcamp Improve your competitiveness with our WorkEx Bootcamp, a solution to bridge the gap between traditional college education and real-world employable skills. Now with guaranteed internship opportunities! Learn more Skill Development Improve your competitiveness with our WorkEx Bootcamp, a solution to bridge the gap between traditional college education and real-world employable skills. Now with guaranteed internship opportunities! Learn more Podar Conversations A flagship monthly series of mentoring talks by Podar Eduspace, bringing together industry CEOs and veterans with decades of leadership experience. Learn More Meet our Board of Advisors EduSPACE: The Blog Explore the knowledge ecosystem and learn more, email us to share your articles. The blog is where the latest opinions, articles and experiences are shared with the community. Read more EduREPORTS EduREPORTS is a programme where we publish the research reports created by the graduating cohorts of the WorkEx Bootcamp and independent research submitted from our community on diverse topics such as technology, social welfare, and more. Read More

  • Podar Eduspace | WorkEx Bootcamp

    WorkEx Bootcamp Find your edge with our premier bootcamp The 2-month online programme integrates courses from Harvard Business School Online and Podar Enterprise, to train young professionals with the necessary interdisciplinary skills to face the challenges of the 21st Century. Apply now for the October/November 2022 Batch [BLOG] Negotiating across your career When you’re in college and just starting out on your career, questions of self-doubt can plague your mind. When you’re on the cusp of entering the real world, a key skill that not many discuss is the art of negotiation. Read more on EduSPACE: The Blog Podar Eduspace partners with National Skills Development Council Podar Eduspace has partnered with NSDC to bridge the gap between industry & colleges, and increase employment opportunities through their upskilling programs, the WorkEx Bootcamp Program and the 21st Century Digital Skills Bootcamp Programs. The students will have access to courses such as Business Analytics, Business Strategy and Data Science, Cryptocurrency, and Metaverse which are in collaboration with Harvard Business School Online as well as Podar Enterprises and will learn industry ready hard skills, soft skills, and digital skills. After a successful completion of Bootcamp, participants will receive 4 certificates, co-branded by NSDC and Podar Eduspace. Podar Eduspace launches skilling initiatives Through our skilling initiatives we aim to work with the Government of India and MNCs to provide skilling to urban and rural communities across India. Through this vision, we seek to work with Anandilal Podar Trust to contribute and give back to our nation. Our objective is to impact the lives of underprivileged youth by providing them skill, employment and livelihood. We have been implementing partners for large scale government projects including: PMKVY and RSLDC. We engage with corporate sector and PSU's as their preferred partner for implementing CSR Projects across pan-India. We work with marginalized youth, women, specially-abled, school & college drop-outs in both rural and urban India. Our industry-connected skilling model will create a visible impact on the lives of over a million uneducated & unemployed youth who enter the workforce each year. ​ We also aspire to give back to society and contribute to India in becoming the Skill Capital of the World. We are working with the Sector Skill Council for People with Disabilities in states like Maharashtra and Rajasthan to train disabled candidates (hearing, sight and locomotive disabilities) and are employing them in various sectors like logistics, telecommunication, etc. CEO presents at the International Education Expo 2022 Vedant Podar, CEO, Podar Eduspace, was invited to speak at the International Education Expo 2022, A MSME DFO Mumbai Initiate under Ministry of MSME, Government of India Official. He spoke about the challenges faced by students under traditional education process and the gap between their knowledge/skill set and industry requirements and the need of upskilling and staying abreast with latest technologies and trends. He shared Podar Eduspace's vision of spreading 21st century skills with India and empower the students with new age skills, technologies and outlook for successful career. EduREPORT: NGOs in the Indian Landscape India as a country: Our eyes reach the stars, our feet are going down quicksand. With a robust state network system and a far-reaching executive, India is still not even close to even achieving universal access to basic services. This glaring gap is taken care of by the intricate NGO sector. Podar Eduspace launches EduREPORTS A programme where we publish the research reports created by the graduating cohorts of the WorkEx Bootcamp and independent research submitted from our community on diverse topics such as technology, social welfare, and more. Submit your today! EduSPACE: The Blog – Design Think(ing) to Innovate Design Thinking is about taking a human-centred approach to innovation that draws from a designers toolkit to integrate the needs of the consumer. Simply put, it is about thinking about a business problem with sensitivity, and not basing the innovation process solely on numbers, adding a touch of human intuition. Podar Eduspace launches EduSPACE: The Blog Explore the knowledge ecosystem and learn more: featuring articles on technology, business and more. Highlights & Latest Developments In collaboration with: In collaboration with: Our Knowledge Ecosystem Our knowledge system WorkEx Bootcamp Co-designing experiential programmes to reduce unemployment and bridge the gap between traditional education and the real working world, in order to help you hone your skills and land your dream job. Learn More Programmes and Initiatives ​ Skill Development Collaborating with our sister organization, the Anandilal Podar Trust, to design programmes alongside the Government of India and MNCs to provide re-skilling and up-skilling services to urban and rural communities across India. Learn More Nandini Bansal, WorkEx Bootcamp Cohort 2 Member Master's at XXX University ​ More Initiatives Coming Soon! Podar Eduspace is currently working to develop numerous programmes and initiatives in the coming months, ranging from internship opportunities to boutique training courses. Stay In Touch Programmes & initiatives Testimonials Hear from our programme graduates on their experiences as part of the bootcamp Nandini Bansal, WorkEx Bootcamp Cohort 2 Member Master's at XXX University ​ Testimonial Nandini Bansal, WorkEx Bootcamp September 2021 Batch, Fashion Institute Mumbai Nischita Paderu, WorkEx Bootcamp September 2021 Batch, OP Jindal Global University "The student to faculty ratio was optimal, giving everyone in the cohort a perfect chance to participate in every session."

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